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Cloud computing, a computer networking model that gives users on-demand access to shared software applications and data storage, [1] is becoming increasingly popular among businesses and individuals. For example, if you use Google’s Gmail [2] for your email and calendaring, or Snapfish [3] for your online photo sharing and storage; or if your business remotely stores data with a third-party server provider like Salesforce, [4] or uses Windows Azure [5] to create and host web applications and services, you are already “floating in a cloud.” To provide guidance to those companies working within a cloud – *2 or those considering utilizing cloud computing – this article surveys U.S. cases that have direct, substantive implications for cloud users. These cases implicate issues of personal jurisdiction, privacy rights, e-discovery, and copyright infringement. [6] We also take a brief look at the newest case on the cloud computing horizon, Google v. The United States. [7] …

 

Fernando M. Pinguelo** & Bradford W. Muller***